Maps




Floodplains: Newington joined the National Flood Insurance Program on July 27, 2006, although very little of the town's land area is susceptible to flooding even in the worst flood in one hundred years. A reliable Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) of Newington has never been prepared by the Federal government. In lieu of such a map, Town officials are guided by data provided by Stone & Webster Engineers that was derived from floodplain maps which that firm prepared while mapping Dover and Exeter. Stone & Webster determined that the 100-Year Flood would attain the elevations (above NGVD) noted below at the following shoreline locations:

6.73' at Gosling Road

6.68' at the General Sullivan Bridge

6.83' at Fox Point

7.00' at Newington/Greenland boundary

 

 

Fox Point: The Town owns 119 acres on Fox Point. This parcel is dedicated to conservation and passive recreation. Access is restricted to Newington residents and their guests. The Fox Point Study Committee formerly advised the Selectmen in regards to maintenance and improvements at Fox Point. A detailed map was compiled by Barbara Hill, Kay Akerley, and Barbara Myers. The map features historic sites, nesting areas, scenic vistas, and designated parking areas.

 

 

Historic USGS Maps: The University of New Hampshire's Diamond Library maintains copies of historic USGS maps online. The maps covering Newington were published in 1893, 1916, 1918, 1920, 1941, and 1956. The maps depict topographical data, of course, but also show roadways, railroads, and buildings. A portion of the 1893 map is depicted here in which Old Post Road, Nimble Hill Road, Fox Point Road, and a portion of Little Bay Road are visible.

 

 

A Street Map of Newington was prepared by the Rockingham Planning Commission in July 2000. This is the most up-to-date general map of the town. It depicts all current streets and roadways.

 

 

The Statewide Property Tax Map depicts so-called "donor towns", "receiver towns", and "receivers receiving less" than they used to. This controversial tax has been particularly unpopular in New Hampshire's seacoast region. The map was prepared in 2001 by the Coalition Communities, an organization that was formed to repeal the the tax. Newington is an active member of the coalition.

 

 

Zoning Districts: The Planning Board and Town Meeting divided Newington into twelve zoning districts (see Article III of the Zoning Ordinance). Five of these zoning districts are located on the Pease Tradeport and are not recognized by State officials. The seven zones outside of Pease are Residential, Historic, Commercial, Office, Marina, Industrial, and Waterfront Industrial. The Marina Zone covers only one parcel: the property owned by Great Bay Marine off of Beanes Lane, Tax Map 6 Lot 9. There are two areas designated Historic, one at the old town center, and the other is land leased from the State at Bloody Point. The Residential Zone includes virtually all other land west of Pease and the Flagstones Drainage Ditch.

All of Newington's commercial & industrial zoning districts (outside of Pease) are depicted on two map segments:

1) land north of Patterson Lane

2) land south of Patterson Lane

 

 

Spaulding Turnpike Expansion: The NH Department of Transportation (NH DOT) has proposed a $120 million expansion of the Spaulding Turnpike in Newington. This proposal includes adding more lanes to the Little Bay Bridges and constructing a new Exit 4 interchange in front of the drive-in theater property.

Scheduling estimates have varied considerably in recent years, but range from 2008 to 2013. Alternative #13 is the configuration that is presently favored by the Newington Planning Board, Conservation Commission, and Board of Selectmen.

 

 

Exit 4 Realignment: The NH Department of Transportation recently constructed an extensive realignment of the Spaulding Turnpike's Exit 4.
Construction was completed in the summer of 2006.

 

 

The Town's GIS Data Policy is detailed here.